November Brings Multiple Hunting Opportunities/Risks

With Halloween over, thoughts for a lot of folks turn to Thanksgiving and Christmas (if your local store doesn’t already have the garland and plastic trees on display). For hunters and outdoorsmen, November brings several different species into season across the United States and with those increased opportunities, come risks.

Canadian Geese and duck migrations will begin to peak in November and waterfowl enthusiasts will head to the blinds. However, those lucky few that get their limit within a couple of hours may get the opportunity to chase pheasants, quail, and chukars for the rest of the day with most states being in full upland mode by at least mid-November.

A cautionary note from one mixed-bag lover to another: Be extra vigilant about the type of shells you’re carrying into the field. It is much too easy to let a lead pheasant load or two slip into your waterfowl blind bag and mix them up when changing gear in your truck. Possession of lead shot during a waterfowl hunt is illegal and could earn you a violation regardless of your intent to bring it with you.

White-tailed deer and Elk will be in full rut mode very soon and hunters will be in their stands or blinds waiting on a trophy buck or bull. If you have the opportunity to buy an antlerless/doe/cow tag, be sure to mark the tag well so you can see which one you’re putting on that big trophy buck or bull. Take a sharpie and note in the margins what the tag is for, especially if you are the Jack of All Trades hunter who also has archery or muzzleloader tags. Note on the back in big letters what method of take/sex of animal the tag is valid for. It can be easy to grab the wrong tag when the rush of a big rack hitting the ground takes over.

At Wildlife Lawyers, the people we serve are often just regular outdoorsmen who have made a mistake and need help with the judicial process. If you find yourself in a situation, please don’t hesitate to reach out to our qualified attorneys who can be your guide through the rocky terrain of the justice system and give you back your rights. We always enjoy helping other outdoorsmen and women get back in the field, and we do our part to protect their rights.